Gruppo di Improvvisazione Nuova Consonanza – The Private Sea of Dreams (1967)

25 Nov

gruppo

Gruppo di Improvvisazione Nuova Consonanza was a free improvisation group founded by Italian composer Francesco Evangalisti in 1964. The many names involved in this project may give one a misleading idea of the group’s sound and goals, as some of the many notables include electroacoustic pioneer Roland Kayn, as well as other composers best known for their work in films and soundtracks such as Egisto Macchi and Ennio Morricone, whose Spaghetti Western scores are firmly embedded and referenced throughout popular culture. The work of Il Gruppo shares very little in common with any of these artist’s other works, and is most often a rejection of them.

Il Gruppo went a step farther in collective improvisation then many of their contemporaries in Free Jazz – who although expressing dissatisfaction with conventions of rhythm, melody and dialogue, still used jazz idioms as a starting point – creating strange pieces which stress total exclusion of any set dynamics, pattern or scheme. The Private Sea of Dreams is an attempt to ignore the musical grammar of the time, and to instead create a new set with its own consistent and internally contained logic, aesthetics and interplay; unquestioningly taken up and built upon by many other free improvisers.

The pieces themselves cover a wide array of sounds: on String Quartet, the composers subvert one of their most trusted forms into a creaking monstrosity, the musicians rubbing and scratching grating shrieks out of their instruments; in Waves (Per Cinque), there are frenetic exchanges and percussive bursts; and in Sunrise (Per Otto), we are treated to the strange, bleating trumpet of Morricone.

Be sure to also check out the beautifully packaged compilation Azione, on Die Schachtel, (a label itself named after one of Francisco Evangalisti’s compositions.)

Download The Private Sea of Dreams here

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